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Chris Nunes, Esq. | Film + Media + Art + Law image image
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What are your rates and are you accepting new clients? Do you require a retainer?

Hiring an entertainment lawyer is one of the most important decisions you will make in your business life. In the entertainment world, a good lentertainment awyer will not only help you avoid problems, but also potentially connect you with new opportunities. I view taking on a new client as an equally important decision. I tend to work fairly closely with them, so the quality of their projects is tantamount to my decision to assist them. Considerations for me:

  • Is the project the kind that I've worked on before? If yes, I'm likely to be able to provide relevant knowledge, experience, and contacts. If no, perhaps it is the kind that I would like some experience with.
  • How far along is the project? The farther along, the less risky it is.
  • Do I have potential conflicts with this project? Do I have other clients that will benefit from being connected to this project?
  • How much of a time commitment is the new project, versus what are my current commitments?
  • What do I think of the overall quality of the project? What is the story about?
  • What are the lyrics about? Is it pure art or publicly minded or commercial?

Sure, some projects come and go if I can quickly help out, but more often than not, I am involved in everything from the early negotiations through the completion of the project. I was proud to discover that over the last 6 years, I have retained over 99.5% of my clients' business. I am always looking to add new high-quality projects.

Generally, the required retainer to begin working on a client's project varies with the project. If I personally connect with the quality of, or the goals of, a project, I will sometimes defer my fees in exchange for a percentage of the project. However, deferring fees is actually more expensive than if I were to bill on an hourly basis up front. This is because, if successful, my percentage of the project equates to more than that hourly fee would have been. By taking a percentage, I am assuming the client's risk that the project will not be successful. I don't get paid unless you get paid, but this also means a larger payoff when it IS successful.

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323.337.9070 | website@chrisnunes.com | 8335 Sunset Blvd, 3rd Floor, West Hollywood, CA 90069 Map It! Email Facebook Twitter LinkedIn image image
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